Piano Sonata in d

for piano solo

You can now enjoy my first sonata for piano solo!

Listen to the Sonata's 3 Movements:

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The sonata has 3 movements and follows a model of classical sonatas created in the period of classicism or romanticism.

Its overall tone is romantic. I really like piano music from the Romantic period and my whole work is inspired by this period.

My wish was to create a sonata that will form a beautiful and logical cycle of three movements, but the movements will also work independently for solo performance.

The sonata is intended for more advanced players. Pupils of higher grades of elementary art schools or the second cycle of art school, or beginning conservators.

It is a challenge! But without the challenge, your piano technique would not improve. 😉

The sonata has 3 movements and follows a model of classical sonatas created in the period of classicism or romanticism.

Its overall tone is romantic. I really like piano music from the Romantic period and my whole work is inspired by this period.

My wish was to create a sonata that will form a beautiful and logical cycle of three movements, but the movements will also work independently for solo performance.

3Dobal1300

The sonata is intended for more advanced players. Pupils of higher grades of elementary art schools or the second cycle of art school, or beginning conservators.

It is a challenge! But without the challenge, your piano technique would not improve. 😉

What are the Movements About?

Find out more by clicking the individual movements:

The first movement is in sonata form, so it is possible to find an exposition, performance and repetition in the style of classical sonatas.

The movement is written in 6/8 bar, and although you will not find any sixteenths in it, the tempo is fast. The relatively exciting main theme is replaced by a contrasting cheerful, naive side theme, which results in a short area of the final theme. Repetition of sonata exposure is not mandatory, but when you play it, it will sound good.

The performance of the sonata offers new musical ideas and new tones. It is built from a modest introduction to a magnificent center and a dramatic conclusion, which results in a repetition of the first movement.

Reprise is shortened. We will not find the main theme of the sonata in it, but we will go straight to the secondary theme, which is now in the main key in D minor. The rerun offers a repetition of the musical ideas of the exhibition with minor variations. The conclusion of the first movement is effective. The movement works in a coherent way and if you play it alone, it will also be a nice effective part of your repertoire.

The second movement is in tempo andante grazioso, i.e. „step and gracefully“. It forms a complete opposite to its two adjacent movements. It is in the dominant key of A major, and with Mendelsohn’s accompaniment and Chopin’s melodies, it resembles a dream from which you will not want to wake up.

Its form is a free ABA without strict boundaries. The music floats here like a river that flows through different tones. The middle part of the movement has an exciting character, as if waves were suddenly made on the calm sea. But it doesn’t take long and we will return to the dreamy atmosphere. The movement ends with the music being blown into a pianissimo, leaving behind only memories of a sweet dream.

The first bar of the third movement pulls the listener out of the dream atmosphere of the second movement. It starts in a hurry, fearlessly on a reduced septacord, and from the first tones it rushes excitedly forward. The theorem has a Brahms character. It does not lack dynamics, chord passages or fast technique.

Its form is again a free ABA with elements of the sonata form. The excited end parts are replaced in the middle part by a mazurka, which is light, airy and carefree. After it ends, the movement plunges into the storm again and the movement ends with a monumental conclusion.

How is the Sheet Music Prepared?

As usual with my pieces, I recorded everything carefully. I wrote down everything you need in the sheet music so that you can start practicing right away. On the 21 pages of the sonata you will find:

Take a look at the sheet music below! 🙂

Eva Lorenc's piano sonata keeps me company every night. No matter what mood I am in, I always find something in it. Sometimes I reach for the romantic second movement, other times I long for the passionate charge of the third movement. But my favorite is clearly the first movement - with its dramatic main theme, gentle side melody and stormy center, it always moves me. A nice bonus for me is also carefully written fingering and pedals - as I'm used to with Eva in her other pieces. I believe that the Sonata will delight all more advanced pianists who love compositions in a romantic style and are looking for something new in their concert repertoire, even for nice moments at home at the piano.
zdenička
Zdeňka Sajdlová
piano teacher

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